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Queuefiles

The following document is included in the documentation directory included with the sbopkg package. Sample queuefiles are also included in that same documentation directory. Additionally, sbopkg co-developer Mauro Giachero has created a large repository of sbopkg queuefiles here: http://gitorious.org/sbopkg-slackware-queues.


README-queuefiles

Sbopkg queuefiles are very simple to create, maintain, and share with
other users. Each queuefile can contain a list of packages to process in
order, from top to bottom, and should be named with a .sqf extension.
Several sample queuefiles are provided in the ./contrib/queuefiles
directory. Please note that these queuefiles are, in fact, only samples
and have not necessarily been tested on the latest release of Slackware
or on Slackware -current. If you wish to use these at your own risk,
remove the '.sample' extension and either put them in $QUEUEDIR or set
QUEUEDIR to where they are (see sbopkg.conf(5) for details).
Additionally, the hope is that user-contributed queues can be shared.
Please consider sending a copy of your queuefile(s) to the sbopkg
mailing list:

    http://sbopkg.org/mailman/listinfo/sbopkg-users

SELECTING ON OR OFF IN DIALOG

    If a line starts with an application's name, it will default to 'ON'
    and be selected in the sbopkg dialog menus when the queuefile is
    loaded. If the application's name is prepended with a '-' it will
    default to 'OFF' and be deselected in the dialog menus.

    For example, a queuefile might contain:

        foo
        -bar
        baz

    In this case, both 'foo' and 'baz' will be 'ON' and appear selected
    in the sbopkg dialog menus, and 'bar' will be 'OFF' and appear
    deselected.

RECURSIVE QUEUEFILES

    Additionally, queuefiles may be loaded recursively. This means the
    user can have separate queuefiles for certain applications, or
    certain queues, and then a 'master' queuefile can bring them all
    together. Recursively-loaded queues are indicated by an '@'
    prepended to the name of the queuefile.

    For example, a user might have one queuefile named 'multimedia.sqf'
    with these items:

        app1
        app2
        app3

    And then the user might have another queuefile named 'desktop.sqf'
    with these items:

        app4
        app5
        @multimedia.sqf

    In this case, when the 'mydesktop.sqf' queuefile is loaded, it will
    first load app4, then app5, then the contents of the multimedia.sqf
    queuefile. The final queue will look like this:

        app4
        app5
        app1
        app2
        app3

    (Note that, while a given queuefile must have the .sqf extension to
    be loaded, the extension is optional within queuefiles. For
    instance, if multimedia.sqf exists in the QUEUEDIR, '@multimedia'
    would work in the above example.)

PASSING BUILD OPTIONS

    Finally, it is possible to pass build options for an application in
    a queuefile. This is done by using a single pipe ('|') character
    after the application name (spaces are optional). For example:

        app | FOO=yes BAR=no

    Only use one pipe to separate the application name and the
    variables.

    In cases where the user has passed options on the command line
    and/or saved build options individually via the dialog interface,
    and also puts build options for that same application in the
    queuefile, sbopkg will ask the user which set should be used.

DUPLICATE BUILDS/OPTIONS

    In all cases, whether loading software names more than once, or
    indicating build options in more than one queuefile, the first
    instance will apply. So if a user has "app" in one queuefile, and
    "-app" in a recursive queuefile that is loaded further down the
    list, the first instance, or "app" will prevail.